FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT TOURS IN OAK PARK

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT TOURS IN OAK PARK AND THE ILLUSTRATED FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT GUIDE TO OAK PARK

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT BLOG

Lute and Daniel Kissam House aka JM Compton House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:35 PM Comments comments (0)





Lute and Daniel Kissam House aka JM Compton House -Ravine Bluffs Development, 1915

1023 Meadow Road, Glencoe IL


The Kissam House is one of a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The four variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000" contain square plans. The first floor of the house contains the veranda facing the street, the living room, dining room, and kitchen. The second floor contains three bedrooms and balconies. Note the horizontal planter in the front yard.

William Kier House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:30 PM Comments comments (0)



William Kier House -Ravine Bluffs Development, 1915 

1031 Meadow Road, Glencoe IL


The Kier House is one of a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The house is square in plan with the veranda, living room, dining room, and kitchen located on the first floor with the bedrooms on the second floor. The original open porch was altered to allow access to a later garage detached from the house to the rear.

Ross House aka Frank Finch House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:30 PM Comments comments (0)



Ross House aka Frank Finch House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

1027 Meadow Road, Glencoe IL


The RossHouse is a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The Ross House is the only one of the five rental houses that does not share the same basic square plan. Here, the chimney is set far to the side as opposed to the center of the house . The house is currently in disrepair and unfortunately may be facing demolition.

Hollis Root House aka SJ Gilfillan House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:20 PM Comments comments (0)





Hollis Root House aka SJ Gilfillan House -Ravine Bluffs Development, 1915

1030 Meadow Road, Glencoe IL


The Hollis Root House is one of a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The Root House is virtually identical in plan to the Charles Perry House, though it is marked in difference by flat roofs instead of gabled roofs. Originally the second floor of the Hollis Root House contained three bedrooms and a sleeping porch, though it has recently been turned into one large bedroom and a library. 

Edmund Brigham House -"A Fireproof House for $5,000", Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 9:45 PM Comments comments (0)





Edmund Brigham House -"A Fireproof House for $5,000", 1915

790 Sheridan Road, Glencoe IL


The Edmund Brigham House is perhaps the most idealistic version of Frank Lloyd Wright's "A Fireproof House for $5,000"  prototype designed for the Ladies Home Journal in 1907, because it was the only variation of the house actually employed in concrete. Preliminary plans for the house for Edmund Brigham were initialized in 1908 while Frank Lloyd Wright was still working out of his Oak Park Studio, though it was not realized until 1915. The square floor plan is complimented by extended wings to the north and south which contain a porte cochere and porch respectively. The Edmund Brigham House currently is capped with terra cotta roof tiles that were not originally of Wright's design.

Laura Gale House, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1909

Posted by George Pudlo on December 17, 2010 at 1:55 AM Comments comments (0)



Laura Gale House, 1909

6 Elizabeth Court, Oak Park IL

Laura Gale was the wife of Thomas Gale, one of Frank Lloyd Wright's earliest clients, for whom Wright built two of his "bootleg" houses. Thomas Gale passed away in 1907, and the Widow Gale subsequently commissioned Wright to design this house for her and her children. Laura Gale would remain in this house until her death in 1943.


The Laura Gale House is one of Frank Lloyd Wright's smaller properties in Oak Park, Illinois. Most of his houses were four to five bedroom houses, but the Laura Gale House is only three bedrooms since it was intended for a smaller family and the lot was significantly smaller. The Laura Gale House was incredibly modern for the time period, and evokes European modernism of the 1930's and 1940's.


The Laura Gale House maintains a strong sense of geometry. With it's blocky appearance, the house is similar to the Unity Temple. Everything about this house is horizontal: the screens of art glass windows, the horizontal wooden trim, and the relationship between solid and void spaces. Wright would later acknowledge the Laura Gale House to be a precursor to his famed Fallingwater, in Pennsylvania, with it's cantilevered balcony. Cantilevering had been used in architecture for centuries by the time Wright designed this house, but it was used in a very primitive manner. It was not until the development of steel and iron that cantilevering could be achieved in such a degree, and Wright was a pioneer of such techniques. Cantilevering occurs in nature all the time: leaves are cantilevered off of branches, branches are cantilevered off of tree trunks. Wright took this concept from nature, and applied it to architecture. But the important question is: Why would he cantilever the balcony off of the structure? Well, if he didn't cantilever the balcony off of the building, he would have to use vertical columns to support the balcony, and Wright eliminated every vertical element of the building.

Raymond W Evans House, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1908

Posted by George Pudlo on December 17, 2010 at 12:38 AM Comments comments (3)



Raymond W Evans House -A Fireproof House for $5,000, 1908

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