FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT TOURS IN OAK PARK

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT TOURS IN OAK PARK AND THE ILLUSTRATED FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT GUIDE TO OAK PARK

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Wright Furniture: Oak Armchair, Frank Lloyd Wright circa 1908

Posted by George Pudlo on March 14, 2012 at 9:15 PM Comments comments (1)

                           


Frank Lloyd Wright designed these oak side chairs as a part of a dining room suite for his lawyer Sherman Booth's house. Located in Glencoe, Illinois, the Sherman Booth House is a part of the Ravine Bluffs Development. Wright said of his furniture: "I found it difficult...to design it as architecture and make it 'human' at the same time -fit for human use. I have been black and blue in some spot, somewhere almost all my life from too intimate contact with my own early furniture."

Lloyd Lewis House, Frank Lloyd Wright

Posted by George Pudlo on November 24, 2011 at 1:25 AM Comments comments (0)


Lloyd Lewis House

153 Little St Mary's Road, Libertyville, Illinois 60048

The Lloyd Lewis House was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in Libertyville, Illinois, in 1940. The house is located in a very private subdivision and is not visible from the street. The occupants of the Lloyd Lewis House must drive down a one lane, dirt road several hundred yards to approach the house. Built with a combination of brick and wood, the Lloyd Lewis House is one of Frank Lloyd Wright's earlier Usonian designs. It is located very near the Des Plaines river and was thus built above grade level.  Lloyd Lewis was editor for the Chicago Daily News, which shut down in 1978, and a published author and playwright. He was a friend of Frank Lloyd Wright's, and Wright mentioned him in an interview conducted in the 1950's.

Sherman Booth House, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on May 5, 2011 at 4:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Sherman Booth House
265 Sylvan Road
Glencoe, IL 60022

The Sherman Booth House is the largest house in the Ravine Bluffs Development in Glencoe, Illinois by Frank Lloyd Wright. It was built at a cost of $16,000 -significantly more expensive than the six other houses built nearby by Wright. The Sherman Booth House is done in the Prairie Style, nicely integrated into its surrounding nature, but peculiar in the sense that it is three stories. Most of Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie Houses would be two stories to keep the low profile. But the Sherman Booth House, as with the Robie House, has three stories. The house features a stucco exterior, and both low hipped and flat roofs that ground the structure into the earth, further connecting it to nature. Both horizontal and vertical features can be seen in the Sherman Booth House.

Charles Glore House, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1951

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 11:12 PM Comments comments (0)







Charles Glore House,  1951

170 N Mayflower Road, Lake Forest IL


BESs

Incredibly low to the ground, the Charles Glore House is a two-story Usonian house by Frank Lloyd Wright. Generally speaking, the Chicago suburbs are home to Wright's early career work, primarily the Prairie Style homes. However, there are a few examples of designs from his late career, the Charles Glore House being one of those. The house is made with pink Chicago common brick, Honduran mahogany, and salmon-colored concrete blocks and overlooks a massive ravine. In the Charles Glore House, a children's room overlooks the two-story living room. The living room, balcony, and a porch are all major cantilevers. Unlike the typical Usonian design, the Charles Glore House maintains a separate workspace and dining room. The basic design work was done by John Howe, who was to Wright as Wright was to Sullivan, though Howe insisted that the design was not his and that no plan left the office without Wright's approval and oversight. The Charles Glore fell into severe disrepair by the 1970's and was vacant by the 1980's, and was then renovated in the late 1980's to it's current splendor. A copper roof replaced the prior shingle roof.

Mary W Adams House, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1905

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 11:03 PM Comments comments (0)





Mary W Adams House, 1905

1923 Lake Avenue, Highland Park IL


In the Mary Adams House, we can see elements of "A Fireproof House for $5,000" in the main massing. The entrance area through the porch is almost a separate annex to the house, similar to that seen in the Larkin Building built just two years prior to the Mary Adams House. Banded windows cover every face of the house and the wide eaved, low pitched hip roofs give a feeling of the house being pushed down into the ground.  There are rooms for both a maid and a manservant, and the house was equipped with a call system so that Mary Adams could call for her help even if she were out on the porch. 

George M Millard House, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1906

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:56 PM Comments comments (0)





George M Millard House, 1906

1689 Lake Avenue, Highland Park IL


The George Madison Millard House is in the same neighborhood as the Mary Adams House and was built just a year after. The house is L-shaped in plan with the first floor containing the living room, dining room, kitchen, servants quarters, and a porch. The fireplace is located in the center of the living room. The second floor contains three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and a sewing room. The exterior of the house features a horizontal pattern similar to that seen in the Arthur Heurtley House in Oak Park, though the facade is faced in wood rather than brick. Note how the protruding horizontal lines on the exterior faces of the home are repeated on the soffits of the overhanging eaves. George Millard's wife later commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to build La Miniatura in Pasadena, California seventeen years later.

Ward Willits House, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1901

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:50 PM Comments comments (1)





Ward Willits House, 1901

1445 Sheridan Road, Highland Park IL


The Ward Willits House of Highland Park stands as a historical pivot of Frank Lloyd Wright's career with the esteemed honor of being the first true Prairie Style house. This massive house was designed for Ward Willits, who was then vice-president of Adams and Westlake Company, a brass foundry. He was later made president. The client and architect continued their relationship with the Wrights after the house was completed, and Willits and his wife accompanied Frank Lloyd Wright and his wife Catherine on a trip to Japan in 1905. The trip was the first of many for Wright, though there is no indication of the relationship with the Willits' continuing afterward. The Ward Willits home is cruciform in plan with the living quarters raised above the ground level on a stylobate. The first floor contains the living room that faces the street, the dining room, kitchen, pantry, servants quarters, reception, porte cochere, veranda, and terrace. The second floor contains five bedrooms, a library, and sewing room. The horizontal planters marking the terrace are similar to those seen in the later Robie House. As with all of Wright's houses, the structure is very much in tune with its surrounding nature. Ward Willits lived in the house until he died at the age of 92.

Lute and Daniel Kissam House aka JM Compton House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:35 PM Comments comments (0)





Lute and Daniel Kissam House aka JM Compton House -Ravine Bluffs Development, 1915

1023 Meadow Road, Glencoe IL


The Kissam House is one of a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The four variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000" contain square plans. The first floor of the house contains the veranda facing the street, the living room, dining room, and kitchen. The second floor contains three bedrooms and balconies. Note the horizontal planter in the front yard.

William Kier House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:30 PM Comments comments (0)



William Kier House -Ravine Bluffs Development, 1915 

1031 Meadow Road, Glencoe IL


The Kier House is one of a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The house is square in plan with the veranda, living room, dining room, and kitchen located on the first floor with the bedrooms on the second floor. The original open porch was altered to allow access to a later garage detached from the house to the rear.

Ross House aka Frank Finch House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:30 PM Comments comments (0)



Ross House aka Frank Finch House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

1027 Meadow Road, Glencoe IL


The RossHouse is a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The Ross House is the only one of the five rental houses that does not share the same basic square plan. Here, the chimney is set far to the side as opposed to the center of the house . The house is currently in disrepair and unfortunately may be facing demolition.

Hollis Root House aka SJ Gilfillan House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:20 PM Comments comments (0)





Hollis Root House aka SJ Gilfillan House -Ravine Bluffs Development, 1915

1030 Meadow Road, Glencoe IL


The Hollis Root House is one of a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The Root House is virtually identical in plan to the Charles Perry House, though it is marked in difference by flat roofs instead of gabled roofs. Originally the second floor of the Hollis Root House contained three bedrooms and a sleeping porch, though it has recently been turned into one large bedroom and a library. 

Charles R Perry House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright 1915

Posted by George Pudlo on December 23, 2010 at 10:10 PM Comments comments (0)





Charles R Perry House -Ravine Bluffs Development, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

272 Sylvan Road, Glencoe IL


The Perry House is one of a series of seven houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by Sherman Booth in what is known as the Ravine Bluffs Development of Glencoe, Illinois. Four of the houses are variations of "A Fireproof House for $5,000", a prototype house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Ladies Home Journal. The Perry House is virtually identical in plan to the Hollis Root House, but is marked with gabled roofs instead of the flat roofs of the Root House. 


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